Don't just dream it! Do it!


Another fitness blog!
How original!
Height: About 5'4"
Starting Weight: Almost 220
ReStart Weight: 194.2
Current Weight:178.6
Goal Weight: 130
UGW: 120

Ask me anything

Source: aworldfullof-love

thunderboltsortofapenny:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

gaymerboy99:

littlelionmonster:

oldmanstephanie:

"Fuck You, Old People" — Group Piece at CUPSI 2014

"By the way, you can’t actually pick yourself up by your own bootstraps. That’s now how physics works."

FUCK. YES.

this gives me life….

"Act your fucking age" god damn, this has a good message here.

39 seconds in and I reblogged it

Source: oldmanstephanie

psych2go:


For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Source: psych2go

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired
i aspire to great things in life

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired

i aspire to great things in life

Source: beowulfstits-archive

abwatt:

doubleadrivel:

did-you-kno:

Source 

I’ll take two.

I went to a conference on learning and the brain once, to help teachers understand how the latest brain science could help us become better teachers.  The two pieces of the brain I learned the most about during those two days were the Hippocampus and the Amygdala — and it turned out that those two pieces of information have been the keys to my best teaching days in the last six years.  Any time I forget these pieces of information, I have a bad class or a bad day or a bad week. Any day I remember these pieces of information, I have a great class — and chances are, my student will, too.
Want to know them? Here they are:
1) The amygdala takes all the sensory data you receive, and analyzes it based on two themes, every 6-8 minutes. The two questions it asks of the data are “Am I safe? Am I having fun?”  If the answer to the first question is no, it immediately turns off the brain’s connections to the front hemisphere of the brain — where all the learning happens; the person relies exclusively on the back-brain, where well-learned responsible operate from. So if a kid doesn’t feel safe in school, the kid won’t learn anything.  If the answer to the first question is yes, the amygdala asks the second question, and if the answer is no, I’m not having fun, the brain begins rooting around looking for some way to create novelty and entertainment, even if that entertainment puts others at risk.  So if a kid is having fun, she’ll learn the material presented, but if she isn’t, she’ll create disruptions, including disruptions that cause other people not to feel safe — and thus shut down their learning. So you can work with “class clown” kids who keep things on topic, but you have to get kids out of the room who behave in ways that make other kids feel unsafe.
That’s number 1.
2) The Hippocampus controls three things: position in space/time (it keeps track of where you are and what ‘time-ish’ it is there), short-term memory, and long-term memory. In other words, the key to knowing some piece of information is remembering where you were when you learned it.  It turns out that the ancient storytellers, seers, and lawyers were right, too, and you can use Palaces of Memory to keep track of things you must remember, and navigate through your memories by tracking in what sort of place you stored them. The really cool thing about this is that your palace of memory can be a real or a fictional place — the hippocampus doesn’t care if it’s being fed false sensory data or true sensory data — if you close your eyes and ‘remember’ standing in your hometown public library, and you go over to the shelf where your mental copy of Beowulf is stored, you have a much better chance of recalling word-for-word quotations than if you just close your eyes. You still have to do the hard work of memorizing the quotation, but remembering the place you memorized it may help bring the memory back even if you forget.
And that’s what I learned at the Learning and the Brain conference.

abwatt:

doubleadrivel:

did-you-kno:

Source 

I’ll take two.

I went to a conference on learning and the brain once, to help teachers understand how the latest brain science could help us become better teachers.  The two pieces of the brain I learned the most about during those two days were the Hippocampus and the Amygdala — and it turned out that those two pieces of information have been the keys to my best teaching days in the last six years.  Any time I forget these pieces of information, I have a bad class or a bad day or a bad week. Any day I remember these pieces of information, I have a great class — and chances are, my student will, too.

Want to know them? Here they are:

1) The amygdala takes all the sensory data you receive, and analyzes it based on two themes, every 6-8 minutes. The two questions it asks of the data are “Am I safe? Am I having fun?”  If the answer to the first question is no, it immediately turns off the brain’s connections to the front hemisphere of the brain — where all the learning happens; the person relies exclusively on the back-brain, where well-learned responsible operate from. So if a kid doesn’t feel safe in school, the kid won’t learn anything.  If the answer to the first question is yes, the amygdala asks the second question, and if the answer is no, I’m not having funthe brain begins rooting around looking for some way to create novelty and entertainment, even if that entertainment puts others at risk.  So if a kid is having fun, she’ll learn the material presented, but if she isn’t, she’ll create disruptions, including disruptions that cause other people not to feel safe — and thus shut down their learning. So you can work with “class clown” kids who keep things on topic, but you have to get kids out of the room who behave in ways that make other kids feel unsafe.

That’s number 1.

2) The Hippocampus controls three things: position in space/time (it keeps track of where you are and what ‘time-ish’ it is there), short-term memory, and long-term memory. In other words, the key to knowing some piece of information is remembering where you were when you learned it.  It turns out that the ancient storytellers, seers, and lawyers were right, too, and you can use Palaces of Memory to keep track of things you must remember, and navigate through your memories by tracking in what sort of place you stored them. The really cool thing about this is that your palace of memory can be a real or a fictional place — the hippocampus doesn’t care if it’s being fed false sensory data or true sensory data — if you close your eyes and ‘remember’ standing in your hometown public library, and you go over to the shelf where your mental copy of Beowulf is stored, you have a much better chance of recalling word-for-word quotations than if you just close your eyes. You still have to do the hard work of memorizing the quotation, but remembering the place you memorized it may help bring the memory back even if you forget.

And that’s what I learned at the Learning and the Brain conference.

Source: didyouknowblog.com

thisisbodypos:

all boobs are good boobs

all stomachs are good stomachs

all thighs are good thighs 

all bodies are good bodies

yes yours, too, and don’t you forget it

Source: thisisbodypos

recoverykitty:

Morning guys. I hope you remember today that if you slip up you can restart your day at any time. You don’t have to wait til the next day to start over. Just sit down, breathe for a few minutes, and start again. 

Source: recoverykitty

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

Source: the-last-teabender

caffeinatedcrafting:

Who says you need to order carry out for fried rice?

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 Cup brown whole grain rice
  • Onion, Diced
  • Carrots, Diced
  • 1 Egg
  • Olive Oil
  • Soy Sauce
  • Vinegar

Instructions:

  • Steam Rice for 45 min, add a little bit of vinegar with the water to make sticky
  • Dice veggies, throw  into pan with oil
  • Throw on rice and cake down
  • Cook for 4-5 min on medium-high heat
  • Flip/Mix Rice
  • Cook for another 4-5 min
  • Move the rice over for the scrambled egg, dice and mix as the egg cooks
  • Throw on soy sauce, let simmer for ~30-45 seconds
  • Eat :3

Source: caffeinatedcrafting

yohoyohoadisneylifeforme:

Hi yes, can I buy all the paintings?

Source: morethanjustdisney